Category Archives: IonE Mini Grant

Campus garden sprouts at U of M CrookstonPhoto by Tashi Gurung

Between the seemingly interminable June rains, ground was broken and crops began to sprout in the Allen and Freda Pederson Garden near the U of M Crookston campus. 

Dan Svedarsky, director of the Crookston Center for Sustainability, says completion of the project is “due in no small measure to support of the garden suppers,” funded through an Institute on the Environment Mini Grant. Continue reading

Tropic of Twin CitiesPhoto by Robert Pittman, Flickr Creative Commons

For many Minnesotans, “tropical” connotes vacation, beaches, pineapples and suntans. With the help of an Institute on the Environment Mini Grant, the Twin Cities Tropical Environments Network (TC-Tropics for short) hopes to expand this view to include the great diversity of tropical environments beyond the beach.

Why the Tropics?

Tropical regions occur between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn, the area of the earth surrounding the equator. The tropics contain the greatest levels of biodiversity in the world, including charismatic animals such as the orangutan and numerous species that have not yet been discovered by humans. Equatorial regions are home to beautiful coral reefs, forests that are critically important to global climate, and billions of people who live in remote rural areas, cities and everywhere in between. In other words, the tropics are a varied and vital part of the planet.

Continue reading

Boreas leadership alum gets Earth Day spotlightUrban heat island

Plenty of folks were out enjoying the overdue warmth of the spring sunshine on Earth Day yesterday — appropriate weather and occasion for a TV news spot highlighting an IonE-supported study at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum on how different landscapes affect local temperatures. The study is part of a project on the urban heat island effect, in which buildings and other urban infrastructure absorb and radiate the sun’s heat, causing cities to be relatively warmer than their rural neighbors. Continue reading

Earthducation Expedition 6 heads to the land of EverestPokhara, Nepal

What does education look like in remote mountain villages where electricity is nonexistent or unreliable? How does a developing country seeking to grow its economy, boost tourism and expand its infrastructure do so sustainably?

Earthducation Expedition 6 aims to find out — and share what it learns with teachers and students around the world. This sixth in a series of seven-continent explorations investigates the intersections between education and sustainability in Nepal, the roof of the world. Led by Aaron Doering and Charles Miller of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development with funding from the University’s Institute on the Environment, the expedition will set out April 27 for a journey to this diverse ecological powerhouse that boasts some of the most majestic geographical wonders on Earth. Continue reading

NutNet: New model for global researchZebra

The Nutrient Network is getting a lot of press these days. Coordinated through a University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment Discovery Grant, NutNet, as it is affectionately called, is a global research network conducting standardized experiments to understand the effects of fertilization on grasslands — land dominated by nonwoody vegetation.

Eric Lind, a postdoctoral associate in the College of Biological Sciences, serves as NutNet’s hub of operations, in charge of information management and network coordination. “What makes NutNet unique is that data are collected using the same protocols across different landscapes,” he says. “These data are allowing us to ask general questions like, ‘What is controlling diversity and productivity?’ ‘How are human activities changing diversity?’ ‘How do these changes impact the environment further on down the road?’” Continue reading

Can technology save the planet?Nanotech by Matthias Weinberger.

The Thinking Ahead Seminar Series: Emerging Technologies and the Environment, hosted by the Humphrey School of Public Affairs with funding from an Institute on the Environment Mini Grant, explores the newest technologies from multiple disciplines inside and outside the University and their potential to help solve the most daunting environmental challenges. Continue reading

Suppers sow inspiration for campus gardenVegetable garden

A series called “Garden Suppers” launched in January on the Crookston campus of the University of Minnesota that aims to sow inspiration for a campus garden. The IonE-sponsored events, featuring guest speakers and brainstorming activities, seek to engage students, faculty and community members in the project.

Discussions have been underway at UMC for the last year to launch a campus garden that would provide produce to be served in campus food service. The garden might consist of smaller garden boxes or plots around campus and/or a larger plot. In addition, there has been interest in having garden plots around the Crookston community, perhaps in vacant lots where houses have been removed to make way for flood protection efforts. Continue reading

A musical environmentCedar Creek.

Imagine encountering a dozen people in the woods improvising on the spot as they’re inspired by what they hear from the forest, or from the savanna, as the wind combs through tall native grasses and whispers inspiration. Sounds and Visions of Cedar Creek is just such an experience–a unique collaboration, one in which the very earth we walk on is recognized and celebrated as an instrument, and where the research of scientists percolates in the minds of artists and comes out as a new understanding.

That’s how University Relations writer Adam Overland describes the unique performance piece “Sounds and Visions of Cedar Creek,” to be held Feb. 27, 5:30 p.m. in the atrium of the Learning and Environmental Sciences Building in St. Paul. The event is free and open to the public. Read more at U of M homepage.

“Sounds and Visions of Cedar Creek” was supported by an IonE Mini Grant. Proposals for Spring 2014 Mini Grants are being accepted through March 16.

Interstate Sustainability Leaders SummitInterstate Sustainability Leaders

Imagine a conference experience that is about more than business card collections, fancy dinners and academic posturing. Imagine a conference experience that extends beyond the closing ceremonies to truly impact your activism.

That is exactly what we had in mind when we dreamed up the Interstate Sustainability Leaders Summit. ISLS would be a modern conference that develops relationships and provides tangible takeaways for grounded dreamers. Continue reading

Mini grants fund research & moreWildlife Mini Grants

Piloting a rooftop garden in Minneapolis, celebrating bike commuters and tracking black bears with drones in northern Minnesota are among the 19 interdisciplinary initiatives the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment has awarded for the fall 2013 round of its Mini Grant program.

IonE Mini Grants are designed to encourage collaboration among faculty, staff and students across University of Minnesota disciplines, units and campuses on environmental themes. Along with up to $3,000 in funding, each recipient is provided space for meetings, workshops and conferences and some administrative support for a year. Continue reading

Collaboration with consistency: The Nutrient NetworkNutNet India

When scientists ask big questions, it’s always difficult to get the big answer. When scientists ask big ecological questions that require synthesizing data from a variety of geographical locations and different research protocols, it can seem downright impossible.

In the case of the Nutrient Network, a project that recently began receiving funding from the Institute on the Environment, that frustration with such scientific incongruence fueled a solution. Continue reading