Featured Fellow: Anthropologist Mark PedeltyPhoto by Daniela Kantorova (Flickr/Creative Commons)

Editor’s note: IonE’s nearly 70 resident fellows — faculty with appointments throughout the University of Minnesota system who come together here to share ideas, inspiration and innovation across disciplinary boundaries — are among the shining stars of IonE’s signature approach to addressing global grand challenges. Over the course of the next year, this series will introduce our diverse resident fellows in their own words. Here we interview IonE resident fellow Mark Pedelty, professor in the College of Liberal Arts. Let the conversation begin!

What’s your current favorite project?

I am writing a book whose working title is Environmentalist Musicians: Cases from Cascadia for Indiana University Press’s Music, Nature, Place series. It is based on six case studies of musicians working with environmental movements, starting with Dana Lyons and ending with the Idle No More movement, performers who mobilize communities through music. They shared their ideas, techniques and experiences with me over the course of two years. Continue reading

New Mini Grant awards focus on Galapagos and morePhoto by Michael R Perry (Flickr/Creative Commons)

A workshop on invasive species in the Galapagos Islands, the launch of a food festival at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and the implementation of a new course on impact ventures in rural Nicaragua are some of the projects receiving Institute on the Environment Mini Grants this spring. Eleven projects received grants of up to $3,000 and one received $5,000 for a total disbursement of $43,300.

Mini Grants are designed to encourage collaboration on environmental themes among faculty, staff and students across University of Minnesota disciplines, units and campuses. Along with funding, each recipient is provided space for meetings, workshops and conferences and some administrative support for a year. Continue reading

Grand challenge: sustainably feed the worldPhoto by sandeepachetan (Flickr/Creative Commons)

The times are a-changin’. In his prophetic 1963 lyrics, Bob Dylan sings that if our time on Earth is worth saving, we’d “better start swimmin’ or . . . sink like a stone.” Whether the times bring food scarcity or abundance, water risk or availability, deforestation or revitalized ecosystems, is up to us. In other words, if we want a sustainable future, we need to start swimming — developing solutions that will allow us to adapt and thrive.

To lead the way, the University of Minnesota recently released a strategic plan detailing the first of a series of “grand challenges” it aims to address over the next 10 years: cultivating a sustainable, healthy, secure food system; advancing industry while conserving the environment and addressing climate change; and building vibrant communities that enhance human potential and collective well-being in a diverse and changing world. Continue reading

NatCap symposium: Influencing outcomes for people and naturePhoto courtesy of Asian Development Bank

In March, the Natural Capital Project, a partnership among the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment, Stanford University’s Woods Institute of the Environment, The Nature Conservancy and the World Wildlife Fund that works to develop ecosystem services concepts, tools and science that influence decision making and lead to better outcomes for humans and nature, hosted a Natural Capital Symposium at Stanford. The three-day event provided a platform for a broad audience to learn new and existing tools, network among fellow researchers and practitioners, and share and discuss ongoing ecosystem services research and projects. Continue reading

5 things we learned about sustainable supply chainsFlickr: Photo by CIFOR (Flickr/Creative Commons)

In the final Frontiers of the semester, Gary Paoli, director of research and program development with Daemeter Consulting, joined Frontiers to talk about the role of sustainability commitments within a supply chain. With a specific focus on palm oil in Indonesia, this lively talk looked at the needs, challenges and successes of such programs in improving corporate responsibility. Here are five things we learned. Continue reading

Grand challenge curriculum aims highfeedtheworld

Can we feed the world without destroying it? Good question — one that students in the University of Minnesota’s Grand Challenge Curriculum (GCC) 3001 course will tackle this fall.

The University and the Institute on the Environment are committed to finding solutions to the global grand challenges facing us now and in the years ahead. One of the grandest of all is how to build a more resilient food system that can provide food security for a growing population while preserving the environment we rely on. Continue reading

Shape a brighter future? These grads are on it.AcaraGrad

If you ever thought a young adult is too inexperienced to make a difference, you haven’t met the participants in the Institute on the Environment’s Acara impact entrepreneurship program.

Through Acara, students from colleges across the University of Minnesota build practical business skills and global experiences while simultaneously launching impactful entrepreneurial ventures aimed at addressing global grand challenges. They are motivated to change the world for the better, and many who participate in the program go on to do so during their careers. Continue reading

Elizabeth Wilson named Carnegie FellowPhoto by Patrick O'Leary

This article is reprinted with permission from the University of Minnesota.

IonE resident fellow Elizabeth Wilson has been selected to the inaugural class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows. Wilson, a leading researcher in energy and environmental policy and law, is one of 32 scholars chosen from more than 300 nominees. She will receive a $200,000 award to support her research examining the complex relationship between renewable and nuclear energy, climate change and economic development, and how policy drives the evolution of energy systems. Continue reading

IonE fellows named Distinguished McKnight ProfessorsCampus Identity

The Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost has announced that University of Minnesota Law School professor  Alexandra B. Klass and College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences professor George E. Heimpel have been named Distinguished McKnight University Professor—two of just five U of M faculty members to receive the distinction this year. Klass and Heimpel are also U of M Institute on the Environment resident fellows. Continue reading

7 things we learned about feedback technologyFlickr: Photo by keila k. (Flickr/Creative Commons)

Frontiers was joined this week by John Petersen, director of the Environmental Studies program at Oberlin College in Ohio. Through an engaging talk on technology and the ways it can be used to provide a visual representation of human impact, Petersen discussed the how the Environmental Dashboard project has leveraged the concept of feedback and the potential it has to change human behavior. Here are seven things we learned: Continue reading

10 things we learned about chemicals & environmentFlickr: Photo by Bert van Dijk (Flickr/Creative Commons)

What better way to commemorate Earth Day than by learning about how our everyday actions affect the environment? This week’s Frontiers focused on common chemical pollutants and their impacts. IonE resident fellow and College of Science and Engineering professor Bill Arnold kicked off the talk, followed by Matt Simcik, associate professor in the School of Public Health and Ron Hadsall, professor in the College of Pharmacy. With conversations ranging from flaming couches to perspiration and peeing, here are 10 things we learned: Continue reading

Oil and gas extraction drives ecosystem lossPhoto by Jeff Wallace (Flickr/Creative Commons)

Present-day oil and gas extraction practices drive the large-scale loss of ecosystem services across the North American Great Plains.

That’s the take-away from a new study published today in Science co-authored by a University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment researcher. Improved drilling technologies coupled with energy demand has resulted in an average of 50,000 new wells drilled per year in central North America — displacing an area of crop- and rangeland equivalent to three Yellowstone National Parks between 2000 and 2012.  Continue reading

Featured Fellow: Industrial Ecologist Tim SmithPhoto © BanksPhotos (iStock)

Editor’s note: IonE’s nearly 70 resident fellows — faculty with appointments throughout the University of Minnesota system who come together here to share ideas, inspiration and innovation across disciplinary boundaries — are among the shining stars of IonE’s signature approach to addressing global grand challenges. Over the course of the next year, this series will introduce our diverse resident fellows in their own words. Here we interview IonE resident fellow Tim Smith, associate professor of environmental sciences, policy and management, and bioproducts and biosystems engineering in the College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences. Let the conversation begin!

What’s the most interesting thing you’re reading now?

I am currently reading Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty (along with just about everyone else . . .). I love the fact that, through his own admission, the book is as much a contribution to our understanding of economic history as illuminating key dynamics shaping wealth and inequality. Our understanding of big thorny problems and our ability to implement potential solutions are rarely isolated within individual fields of study or areas of practice. His interpretation of the societal, political and economic balancing act dictating the roles of income and capital across countries is fascinating. Continue reading

Study: Plants’ ability to absorb CO2 limitedPhoto by César Viteri Ramirez (Flickr Creative Commons)

Does more atmospheric carbon mean bigger plants?

Not necessarily, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment researcher. Most climate scenarios, including those of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, assume that, since plants convert carbon dioxide to food for growth, more CO2 in the atmosphere will accelerate plant growth, thereby reducing the net amount of this greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. This study supports a growing body of knowledge that suggests instead that plants can’t keep absorbing more CO2 because there aren’t enough nutrients in the soil to sustain their growth.  Continue reading

6 things we learned about managing pandemic threatsFlickr: Photo by Matthew Anderson (Flickr/Creative Commons)

The April 15 Frontiers looked at ways we can manage disease threats at home and abroad. Thanks to a diverse panel including Patsy Stinchfield, director of infection prevention and control at the Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota; Cheryl Robertson, an associate professor in the School of Nursing, and John Deen, a professor of Veterinary Population Medicine, here are six things we learned:
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Featured Fellow: Environmental Educator Patrick HamiltonPhoto by Arend (Flickr Creative Commons)

Editor’s note: IonE’s nearly 70 resident fellows — faculty with appointments throughout the University of Minnesota system who come together here to share ideas, inspiration and innovation across disciplinary boundaries — are among the shining stars of IonE’s signature approach to addressing global grand challenges. Over the course of the next year, this series will introduce our diverse resident fellows in their own words. Here we interview IonE resident fellow Patrick Hamilton, program director of Global Change Initiatives at the Science Museum of Minnesota. Let the conversation begin!
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Energy Transition Lab promotes 21st century upgradesPhoto by mwwile (Flicker Creative Commons)

The Energy Transition Lab, supported by the Institute on the Environment, the Office of the Vice President for Research and the Law School, brings together leaders in government, business and nonprofit organizations to develop new energy policy pathways, institutions and regulations.

In this audio clip, Hari Osofsky, ETL’s faculty director, Law School professor and IonE resident fellow, discusses the lab’s goals and what communities and business and utility partners are doing to bring the energy system into the 21st century with WTIP North Shore Community Radio.

Photo by mwwile (Flickr Creative Commons)

RCP recognized for excellence, innovationPhoto by Patrick O'Leary

The Resilient Communities Project has been selected as the 2015 recipient of the MAGS/ETS Excellence and Innovation in Graduate Education Award. Jointly sponsored by the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) and Educational Testing Service (ETS), this annual award is given to a MAGS member institution in recognition of outstanding contributions to domestic and international graduate education at both the graduate school and program level.
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