Tag Archives: regulation

Ten things we learned about the energy transitionclean energy transition

This week’s Frontiers in the Environment was presented David Letterman–style by Energy Transition Lab executive director Ellen Anderson and Energy Transition Lab faculty director Hari Osofsky, who is also an IonE resident fellow and Law School professor. The pair explored the “Top 10″ key areas of energy transition and the Energy Transition Lab’s role in them.

10.  Treat energy as a system. Instead of seeing energy as a technological process, we
need to view it as an intertwined system involving politics, finance and social
innovations.

9.    Bring renewable energy to scale. Given time, technology can improve and prices can
drop. We may be underestimating the growth and potential of renewables.

8.   Address the risks of unconventional energy in new energy frontiers. Oil and natural        gas in the Arctic could shift the energy focus away from the contiguous United States.            With new locations comes new challenges; addressing topics such as risky
procurement (for example, hydraulic fracturing and deep-water drilling) will be
important to the new energy world.

7.  Create 21st century utility models. Traditional energy systems reward energy
companies based on their reliability, stability, rates and capital investment. To create a
stronger system, companies need to be given credit for innovation, environmental
performance, flexibility and encouraging customers to use less energy.

6.  Stop wasting energy. Conventional energy systems waste a lot of energy, particularly
from waste heat. There are a lot of opportunities to improve upon this if we can
overcome laws that hamper innovation.
5.  Capture economic opportunity and use market tools. The energy transition
represents not only an environmental opportunity, but an economic one as well. For
many companies, the cost of continuing with business as usual may be higher than the
costs of taking action on climate change.
4.  Think locally and act locally. Since a significant portion of the world population lives
in cities, cities must play a crucial role in the energy transition. University of
Minnesota’s Energy Transition Lab is working to provide tools to help urban centers
make this shift.
3.  Education, collaborate and innovate for impact. Planning for the energy transition
now will help guide its future. The Energy Transition Lab is working to help plan
Minnesota’s energy future and use this information to understand and shape the energy
future on a regional and global level.
2.  Make progress in a partisan political environment. Pairing energy transition goals
with economic development goals could help create common ground for progress.
Working at a smaller scale where partisanship is less intense than at larger scales may
also provide fertile ground for moving forward on needed energy transitions.
1.  Ride the wave: Capitalize on positive trends. Universities value innovation, a vital
tool to solving the challenge of an energy transition. Another bonus? Universities are
full of members of the Millennial generation, 93 percent of whom believe continued
dependence on fossil fuels has weakened the economy and stifled innovation.

Like to learn more? Watch a video of the presentation.

Frontiers: Adventures in carbon reductionElectricity transmission lines

Environmentalists in the United States have long pushed for reductions in carbon emissions. Now, it seems the era of carbon regulation may be upon us.

Portrait: J. Drake HamiltonBut implementing these complex regulations is complicated and takes place at both the federal and state levels. This was the topic of Fresh Energy science policy director J. Drake Hamilton’s Frontiers in the Environment lecture last Wednesday, April 30 on the University of Minnesota’s St. Paul campus.

In “Adventures on the Frontiers of Carbon Reduction,” Hamilton emphasized the need to educate the public on new and existing policies impacting carbon emissions for broader public involvement.

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Frontiers: What IS the green economy?Green Economy - Stephen Polasky.

When you think of the economy, chances are the “green” that comes to mind is money, not nature. But what if there wwere truly a green economy – one that accounts for the value of the environment in economic decision-making?

That was the topic of last week’s Frontiers in the Environment lecture presented by Steve Polasky, an IonE resident fellow and Regents professor of applied economics. Polasky delivered his speech, “What IS the Green Economy? And How Do We Get One?” Feb. 12 at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul. While economics and the environment do not always seem to go hand in hand, it was his love for nature that pushed Polasky to pursue economics.

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Frontiers: Transporting energyEnergy Transformation

In an age when debates over fracking and renewable energy dominate the news, it’s increasingly clear that the United States is in the midst of an “energy renaissance.” Along with a host of environmental concerns, the nation’s changing energy system faces a new, often overlooked, challenge: How can we get energy from its source to the people who need it?

Portrait: Alexandra KlassThat was the topic of Institute on the Environment resident fellow and University of Minnesota Law School professor Alexandra Klass’ Frontiers in the Environment lecture Dec. 4.

In “Transporting Energy: U.S. Infrastructure Challenges,” Klass discussed her research on the physical and regulatory system in place for moving oil, natural gas and electricity and possible changes needed as the nation’s energy sources diversify.

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